Landlord News

What is the NLA?

Em Morley - September 5, 2014

The National Landlords Association (NLA) aim to provide landlords with all of the knowledge they need to let their properties in a safe, secure, and mutually beneficial manner.

The 50 Acts of Parliament and 70 sets of regulations surrounding the private rental sector can put a lot of pressure on landlords, so it is vital that they fully understand their legal requirements.

What is the NLA?

What is the NLA?

The NLA lobbies the Government on behalf of their members, to strive for a fair system for landlords and tenants alike. They also educate their members on their statutory rights and responsibilities.

The NLA has more than 55,000 members and associates, from full time landlords, to those with Houses of Multiple Occupation (HMOs), to those with one-bedroom flats.

Their regional representatives and braches offer support for NLA members and local authorities.

Being at the centre of the Government’s decision making, the NLA influence politicians and civil servants, to ensure any changes are reasonable and non-discriminatory.

The NLA celebrated 35 years of operation in autumn 2008. Throughout this time, they have made many steps in protecting landlords and their tenants:

  • Tenancy Deposit Protection: The NLA worked with the Association of Residential Letting Agents (ARLA) to lobby against a Government plan to have just a custodial scheme. This would make it obligatory for a landlord with an Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) to give their tenants’ deposit to a third party. The NLA successfully overturned this proposal, permitting landlords to keep hold of their tenants’ deposit if they wish.
  • HMO licensing: If the NLA did not step in, the already complex area of HMO licensing would be even more difficult. The views of landlords are now taken into account when ordering the regulations.
  • Section 21: The NLA emphasised the terrible consequences that can arise from amendments to Section 21, a landlord’s ability to regain possession without grounds. The NLA highlighted that there are bad tenants, as well as bad landlords.
  • Energy efficiency: The NLA lobbies for the initiation of the Landlords Energy Saving Allowance (LESA), and also for its continuation after the proposed end in 2009. The LESA will now stay in place for another seven years. Under the scheme, landlords can use a tax allowance of £1,500 toward making energy efficiency improvements to their rental homes.
  • Fire safety: The NLA teamed up with the Local Authorities Coordinators of Regulatory Services (LACORS) to form a procedure for identifying if local authority or fire authority should conduct inspections on different types of property. This stops landlords having to have duplicate inspections, which require different standards.
  • Improved sector representation: The NLA announced on 6th October 2010 that it is to team up with the UK Association of Letting Agents (UKALA). These joint forces should make revolutionary progressions in the industry.

The NLA tries to encourage the image of the private rental sector as a valuable investment. They work alongside the national and local Government, to provide a fair set of regulations for landlords, ensuring a healthy relationship between landlords, letting agents, and tenants.