Property News

One in five Britons have fallen out with neighbours

Ryan - October 26, 2016

An interesting new report has revealed that around one in five property owners has been involved in a dispute with their neighbours.

A portrait of the modern British community report from Co-op insurance gives an insight into most-common disputes and changing communities in the UK.

Nuisance Neighbours

Of people who have had problems with their neighbours, noise was the most common reason. 41% of residential problems were due to noise related issues, such as loud arguments, parties or banging around.

22% of respondents suffered rude or abusive neighbours, with 21% experiencing issues with barking dogs. 19% had issues surrounding parking.

By region, London and Birmingham saw the largest number of neighbour problems. 25% of those questioned in these regions said they had seen some kind of problem in the last year. On the other hand, people in Milton Keynes get along the most, with just 7% experiencing neighbour disputes in the same period-compared to the national average of 20%.

The top-ten reasons for disputes with neighbours were found to be:

1 Excessive noise 41%
2 Rudeness or abuse 22%
3 Barking dogs 21%
4 Parking wars 19%
5 Nosey neighbours 18%
6 Unruly kids 15%
7 = Boundary disputes 12%
7 = Gossipy neighbours 12%
8 Messy gardens which blight the community 11%
9 Roaming pets 7%
10 Not keeping shared facilities maintained 6%

[1]

One in five Britons have fallen out with neighbours

One in five Britons have fallen out with neighbours

Good neighbours

Data from the report shows that a Briton’s ideal neighbour would show respect at all times, with 77% agreeing this makes a good person to live next door. 75% said tolerance was the most important trait.

Half of under 35’s have never been in their neighbours’ property, but 77% of over 55’s have.

However, just 19% of people have been invited round to a neighbouring property for a brew!

James Hilton, Director of Products at the Co-Op Insurance, observed: ‘The research shows as a nation we’re at risk of losing the community spirit we once prided ourselves on. Strengthening our communities whilst making them safer places to live is firmly at the heart of the Co-op. Communities are valuable as they allow people to interact with each other, share experiences and develop valued relationships. Without communities we’re in danger of living isolated lives.’[1]

‘However, as our lives, both in and away from the home, become ever busier and we spend more time engaged with technology – TV, the internet and social media, its seems we are becoming ever-more distant from our closest neighbours.  As a nation we need come together, lose the British stiff upper lip and engage with our neighbours, who in time may become friends,’ he added.[1]

[1] http://www.propertyreporter.co.uk/property/1-in-5-brits-have-been-involved-in-a-dispute-with-neighbours.html